About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11
straight day. president obama defends israel's right to self-defense. our correspondents have tlatest from the war zones. >>> could the woman at the center of the petraeus scandal now face prosecution? >>> those red light cameras that target drivers may actually be against the wall. >>> we begin with today's eye opener. your world in 90 seconds. >> israel launched new strikes this morning. attacks enter their sixth day. >> israeli air strikes pound gaza. >> still blasting away at rocket sites. plenty of civilians caught in the cross-fire. >> also two media centers -- whoa! that was a rather large explosion. >>> hamas leaders demanding israel and its blockade of gaza. >> it's looking more and more like everybody's looking for a way out. the question is in a region like this, can they find one? >>> this morning the president game the first american president to visit the asian nation of burma. >> mr. obama met with pro-democracy activist aung san suu kyi at the same lakeside villa where she spent 15 years under house arrest. >>> paula broadwell at the center of the david petraeus scandal has
and israel. >> reporter: good morning. that vote will take place in the general assembly where there will be only observer status. to become a member you need u.n. security council and that won't happen because the u.s. will veto it. the u.s. and israel tried hard to get palestine not to go along with today's vote. but they are now down playing it it doesn't give palestine what it wants. it's quiet this morning outside the u.n. but demonstrators are expected to protest the vote on palestinian recognition. palestinians are seeking status as a nonmember observer. palestinians say they need u.n. recognition of a palestinian state in the west bank in order to get israel back to the negotiating table. the u.s. insists on direct negotiations with israel. >> the path to a two state solution is through jerusalem and ramallah, not new york. >> reporter: they recognized the palestine 1977 borders before israel fought and won part of palestinian land. >> we know the occupation will not disappear, we know that there might be certain consequences because israel wants to punish us. >> report
begin in the middle east. this morning efforts to end the fighting between israel and hamas have so far come up short. fighting rages on both sides of the border. secretary of state hillary clinton held a late night meeting with the israeli prime minister. this morning she met with palestinian president. later today she will be in cairo to meet with world leaders. palestinian gunmen shot and killed six men they say were collaborating israel and dragged one body behind a motorcycle. susan mcginnis is watching all of this. >> reporter: good morning. once again there were signs of a deal and, again, they slipped away. now in cairo, secretary clinton will meet with officials who are in contact with hamas and now talking about a deal she says in the days ahead. as truce talks continue so does the violence. this is what cbs reporter charlie d'agata saw from his gaza city hotel early this morning. the israeli military launched dozens of air strikes overnight and this morning. and hamas militants have launched more than 100 rockets into israel in the past 24 hours. five israelis and more than 1
raid sirens and explosions, violence escalates in the middle east. israel inches closer to sending ground forces into gaza. we are at the border. >>> nfl commissioner roger goodell is in studio 57 to talk concussions, expansion and why your kids should still play football. >>> but we begin this morning with a look at today's eye opener. your world in 90 seconds. >>> we lost four americans. are there still questions out there? you bet. we're going to continue to work to get those answers. >> former cia director david petraeus heads to capitol hill. >> testifying before a house committee. >> about that deadly september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. >> all while the cia announces its launching an investigation into petraeus' conduct while he was still in charge of the agency. >> petraeus insists no classified documents exchanged hands during his affair. >>> this battle is escalating. >> israel is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend our people. >>> as long as i've been here i haven't seen something to this magnitude. >> four people are dead and 17 m
ago mohamed morsi won widespread praise for brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today thousands of egyptians protested at morsi granted himself broad new powers, putting his decisions above any court. morsi called the move temporary but at least 100 people were injured as protesters clashed with police in cities across egypt, including alexandria and the capital. holly williams begins our coverage tonight in cairo. >> reporter: thousands of egyptians poured on to the streets, furious with the country's first democratically elected president. they accused mohamed morsi of behaving like a pharaoh, making a power grab by presidential decree. during the arab spring, egyptians came together on tahrir square to top it will country's long-time dictator hosni mubarak. today mr. morsi's critics clashed with his supporters while police fired tear gas canisters into the crowd. "he's saying that he's our god" said this protester. "he's made a mistake." and this woman said that after marching for freedom the country's ended up with a new dictator. in alexandria, an angry crowd stor
but on the other hand you saw last week how important morsi was in putting together the cease-fire between israel and hamas. he will be important on issues like iran, on countering terrorism. he now is one of the dominant figures in the middle east. so the administration doesn't want to alienate him but i do think they have to speak truth to power. and there will be criticism both from the united states and many other countries about this worrisome sign of possible return to authoritarianism in egypt. >> glor: nicholas burns, thank you. palestinian authority president abbas spoke to his supporters on the eve of his departure to the united nation where he will argue that plan should be upgraded to an observer state. abbas's predecessor yasser arafat died eight years ago. some still suspect foul play. as allen pizzey reports tonight an extraordinary step will be taken this week trying to resolve doubts once and for all. >> reporter: for many palestinians yasser arafat is more a relic of history than part of the ongoing struggle for an independent state. for a brief period this week, however, he wil
that arafat was poisoned by israel. israel denies those allegations. >>> back this country, the white house says treasury secretary timothy geithner will leave the negotiations with republicans on the so called fiscal cliff, those tax increases and spending cuts that would kick in next year. lawmakers returned to washington yesterday amid some talk of compromise, but the issue of how to raise revenue remains a critical and hard to overcome sticking point. susan mcginnis is live in washington with more. >> reporter: those changes kick in if no alternative deal is made. as of now, both sides are still talking about their willingness to compromise, but when it comes to that main issue, raising tax rates, both sides are digging in. democratic senator dick durbin will give what's being called a major speech laying out a case for a bipartisan fiscal deal. he's a member of the senate's gang of eight, four democrats and four republicans who have collaborated on ways to reduce the nation's debt for two and a half years. democratic senator mark warner is part of the gang and says democrats are willin
with recognition. it is a setback for israel and the united states. margaret brennan joins us to tell us why the u.s. voted no. >> reporter: good morning to you, charlie, and to norah. israeli government says it gives palestinians a state without ending the conflict. u.n. recognition makes the west bank and gaza strip part of the palestinian state not defeated territory. without negotiating the borders of one with israel. here is the problem. negotiation negotiations are in a standstill. as we saw last week violent extremists like hamas are gaining influence. palestinian authority, which rejects violence, recognizes israel, is losing influence and patience. last week secretary clinton c s successfully negotiated the cease fire but wasn't able to persuade palestinian president mahmoud abbas to drop this bid. >> margaret, are there consequences for the united states and iz role for this vote? >> reporter: potentially. the concern is that congress could cut off funds to the palestinian authority. the u.s. gave about $495 million in aid last year, which helped keep that peaceful government in power.
will be immediately reburied with full military honors. palestinians are convinced israel supplied the poison. bedali is more interested in finding out if they had help from palestinian collaborators. >> a body has to be respected. we should know who did it and i don't think that by taking of his body they will know it. >> reporter: in the meantime, his image remains useful. it held pride of place at a demonstration to support a bid to gain observer status at the united nations for the palestinian state arafat spent his life trying to create two days after he was to be dug up and reburied. allen pizzey, cbs news, ramallah. >>> in massachusetts, officials are blaming a utility worker for a massive natural gas explosion. the blast friday night injured 18 people and damaged 42 buildings in springfield. the state fire marshal says the worker was responding to a gas leak when he accidentally punctured an underground pipe. and immediately called the fire department. >>> coming up mention, your weather forecast. and in sports a show of solid darety in indianapolis. two colts cheerleaders get buzzed for a go
in the israeli-palestinian conflict. last week he helped broker a truce between hamas and israel. so we're back in the same situation we had under the old dictatorship which is that the u.s. can't be to overtly critical because it relies on egypt's help here in the middle east. >> holly williams in cairo for us this morning. thank you so much. let's take a quick break. when we come back the latest on the civil war in syria including a report from one city at the center of the conflict. later, would be millionaires line up for a chance at tonight's historic powerball lottery drawing. this is the "cbs morning news." powerball lottery drawing. this is the "cbs morning news." or visit exelonpatchoffer2.com. cool, you found it. wow. nice place. yeah. [ chuckles ] the family thinks i'm out shipping these. smooth move. you used priority mail flat-rate boxes. if it fits, it ships for a low, flat rate. paid for postage online and arranged a free pickup. and i'm gonna track them online, too. nice. between those boxes and this place, i'm totally staying sane this year. do i smell snickerdoodles? maybe. [
israel is the culprit. what they really want to the know is who helped them? allen pizzey ramallah. >>> and former fbi assistant director joins us now. what do you make of this? >> this harkens back to the alexander case in london. the former kgb spy also poisoned with polonium 210. that was 2006. this was 2004. dropped in his tea by somebody he met at a hotel you and i have been to in the square. that also suggests if you look at the arafat case the amount of proximity you would have to have to do this in other words, there weren't half a dozen plo leaders or family member whose got sick when somebody poisoned a meal. if in fact this turns out to be a poisoning, it had to be somebody one on one who to cut this into this drink in a fair amount. >> i know polonium 210 used with alexander and suspected with yasser arafat. his body has been interred for years. what's the chances they'll find traces of that? >> the fbi, the guy who worked on the other case a shelf life of 138 days. a pound of it 138, a half pound of it. interred since 2004. a highly concentrated bu
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11